Overblog Suivre ce blog
Administration Créer mon blog
21 avril 2011 4 21 /04 /avril /2011 06:21

 

ANALYSE SITUATION ENERGETIQUE DU CANADA

ASPO

 

 

 

 

http://aspocanada.ca/eia-country-analysis-briefs-canada.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

http://aspocanada.ca/eia-country-analysis-briefs-canada.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Repost 0
23 février 2011 3 23 /02 /février /2011 07:21

 

ANALYSE SITUATION ENERGETIQUE DU CANADA

ASPO

 

 

 

 

http://aspocanada.ca/eia-country-analysis-briefs-canada.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

http://aspocanada.ca/eia-country-analysis-briefs-canada.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Repost 0
23 septembre 2010 4 23 /09 /septembre /2010 10:46

 

PIC DU CRUDE OIL 1973

 

 

File:Canadian Oil Production 1960 to 2020.png

Repost 0
23 septembre 2010 4 23 /09 /septembre /2010 10:46

 

PIC DU CRUDE OIL 1973

 

 

File:Canadian Oil Production 1960 to 2020.png

Repost 0
23 septembre 2010 4 23 /09 /septembre /2010 10:07

ELECTRICITE AU CANADA

 

 

ARTICLE WIKIPEDIA

 

 

 

 

http://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/%C3%89lectricit%C3%A9_au_Canada

 

  Fichier:Electricity production in Canada-fr.svg

 

 

 

http://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/%C3%89lectricit%C3%A9_au_Canada

 

 

In 2007, Canada generated 617.5 terawatt-hours (TWh),[30] which ranks the country 7th worldwide. Approximately 822 generating station are scattered from the Atlantic to the Pacific,[31] for a nameplate capacity of 124,240 megawatts (MW).[32] The 100 largest generating stations in Canada have a combined capacity of 102,341 MW. In comparison, the total installed capacity of Canada was 111,000 MW in 2000.[33]

 

 

 

Repost 0
12 avril 2010 1 12 /04 /avril /2010 16:53
Repost 0
12 avril 2010 1 12 /04 /avril /2010 16:52
Repost 0
31 mars 2009 2 31 /03 /mars /2009 07:14


TOD CANADA

THE OIL DRUM
THE OIL DRUM CANADA
LOIS DE LA THERMODYNAMIQUE


In this house we obey the laws of thermodynamics!
------------------------------------------------------------------
Posted by Libelle on December 30, 2008 - 11:11 pm in The Oil Drum: Canada
Topic: Miscellaneous
Tags: energy, entropy, heat, original, thermodynamics, work [list all tags]

When you use energy, the rules are well defined. The first and second laws of thermodynamics have been well understood for more than a century, and the third a little more than a century, but the topic is still considered by most to be rather obscure. That is unfortunate, because these two laws are so important, and because almost everyone has a good understanding of the first and second laws, even if they think they do not. Understanding the implications of the legislation is another matter.



There are many versions of mischievous acts. All I like most is:


(zeroth law) You must play the game
(first law) You can not win.
(second law) You can not break even on a very cold day.
(Third Law) It is not cold.


They are surprisingly accurate.

The laws are, it should be recalled, experimentation at the outset. The world has been found to work that way.




Zeroth law
The zeroth law actually states that if two systems A and B are in equilibrium with each other, and systems B and C are also in equlibrium with each other, then systems A and C are also in equilibrium with another. Another way, is that situations like Escher "Waterfall" will not occur in real life.

You must play the game




First law
The first law is the law of conservation of energy. It includes the equivalence of heat and working conditions, but is more general in that there are many forms of energy are interconvertible, but the total for an isolated system remains constant over time. One point that is often misunderstood is the role of the equation E = mc2. It is usually refer to a conversion of matter into energy, but the reality is more simple. Energy is the mass, the equation and tells you how. Whatever the conversion takes place in an isolated system, its total energy (and hence mass) remains constant.

You can not win.




Second Act
The second law is that which results from the observation that hot losing heat to cold things. This is a one-way process. Mechanical work is transformed into heat. The heat can be converted into mechanical work, but there are limits. The implications of this are far and an amount can be deducted (and defined) from this experience and thought.

If we have two heat reservoirs (both practical infinite capacity) at different temperatures, then we can build devices that take heat from the hotter reservoir, turn some of them into mechanical work and reject the rest to the cold tank. The rejection of some of the heat was considered inevitable, but the amount of waste heat becomes less than the temperature of the heat source is high. In the absence at this stage to define what we mean by the numerical value of the temperature, we assume that the maximum conversion efficiency is a function of both temperatures. Engine efficiency is generally defined as [working in the heat], but in this case, I will look at [the heat of the heat] or [1 - effectiveness]. If temperatures are two tanks T1 and T2 and heat from the T1 is warmer and the heat released in q2 is cold, then we say that:

q2/q1 = F (T2, T1) F is an unknown function (an algebraic expression) of the two temperatures.

Maximum efficiency implies the reversibility of the process. An example of this is that the heat transfer hottest tank engine must take place without any difference in temperature between the tank and the engine that absorbs heat. If there is no difference, the heat engine operates at a lower efficiency (smaller temperature difference between hot and cold), and it would not be possible to run the process backwards (no heat flow "upstream"). There can be friction either. The engine with maximum efficiency is reversible and can be used as a heat pump, pumping heat from the reservoir of the fountain hottest and requiring mechanical work to do. The values of Q1 and Q2 are the same as in the case of the engine, but the direction of flow is reversed and the work is put into the system rather than be taken. The absence of differences in temperature between the engine / heat pump and its heat reservoirs also means that the process will be much slower, but it is the case for all these machines ideal.

Now suppose we have a third heat reservoir at a lower temperature still, T3, and a second engine that operates between the second and third reservoirs. If the heat from the second tank is q2 (rejected by the first engine) and has rejected the third q3, then:

q3/q2 = F (T3, T2)

But we could instead have used a motor directly between the first and third reservoirs. This engine must have the same efficiency as the combination of the other two, because if it did not, then the heat could be run continuously around the cycle of three engines, using the power of one or two engines driving the other (s) to the rear, leaving a net work with the production of heat is taken from a single reservoir. This is not consistent with the way things work. So:

q3/q1 = F (T3, T1)

But: q3/q1 = (q3/q2) x (q2/q1)

So: F (T3, T1) = F (T3, T2) x F (T2/T1)

If you have not turned off at the beginning of algebra, it should be obvious that this is a very serious restriction on the nature of the function F. During the last equation, T2 on the right side disappears, as a result of simple multiplication. This means that F (T1, T2) must be of the form f (T1) / f (T2), where f is another function.

So: q2/q1 = f (T2) / f (T1)

May you not forget that I started this argument without defining what is meant by a temperature. This equation gives us the opportunity to define a temperature scale, by selecting the function f. That's what William Thomson (later Lord Kelvin) was in 1848. He chose f (T) to be as simple as possible:

f (T) = T

So: F (T2, T1) = T2/T1 and T2/T1 = q2/q1

In other words, an absolute temperature scale can be defined as a function of engine thermal properties are independent of any substance. If an ideal heat engine has a conversion efficiency of 50% (half of the heat is converted into work and half of the heat rejected), the ratio of heat to the temperature of heat source temperature is 2 - by definition.


To complete the definition of such an absolute temperature scale, we need to define the size of a diploma. If we measure size as the difference between the freezing and boiling water is 100 degrees, we have a scale that may correspond to the Celsius scale, but with a lag corresponding to the point of freezing of water on the absolute scale. This discrepancy is 273.15 degrees and now we have the Kelvin scale.

Entropy
The idea of entropy is associated in most minds with the ideas of order and disorder (entropy higher = more disorder). That is correct, but the origin of the idea comes from the flow of heat. If a quantity of heat q enters a system (absolute) temperature T, then the system increases the entropy of q / T. That is the definition of entropy. If we look at the first heat engine above, the entropy of the hot reservoir decreases q1/T1 and the increase of the cooler by q2/T2. If the engine is reversible, q2/q1 = T2/T1, so the overall change in entropy is zero. It is a characteristic of the process is reversible. In real process, the total change of entropy is always positive. One example is the flow of heat from a warm body to a cooler - the hot body loses entropy, the cooler, but we win more than one has lost the hottest since the T in the q / T is the most small and q is the same.


Available work, or Exergy
The maximum amount of work that could be extracted as a product of a process (ie, if it produces a reversible manner) can be easily calculated from energy and entropy changes between States of departure and arrival process. This is sometimes called the exergy available initially. Just how it is derived in May May be another assignment. Exergy, unlike energy, may be destroyed. The ideal of work is never done, of course, but it is fairly simple to show that the exergy irretrievably lost when an irreversible change takes place is equal to the increase in entropy associated with the irreversible, multiplied by the temperature of the environment in which the process takes place. This is the lowest temperature at which heat can be rejected by the process. It follows that if the ambient temperature is absolute zero, there is no loss of exergy or available work, no matter what.

You can not escape, even on a very cold day.




Third Law
There are two ways of the third law by stating:

The entropy of each pure substance at absolute zero is zero.
It is impossible to achieve absolute zero in a finite number of steps.

The reason why the second follows from the first is that any process that reduces the temperature of a substance must contain a step in which the change of entropy. If any of the entropy is zero, then no change of entropy are possible and there is no way to do it for cooling. In fact, the law is observed that the change of entropy is always zero. It is easy to declare all entropies zero at absolute zero, which corresponds to the statistical interpretation of entropy. It can get very close (in degrees) of absolute zero - the current record is around 10-10K, but it gets closer, it becomes more difficult to cool.

It is not cold.




160 In the comments on this house, we obey the laws of thermodynamics!
Comments can no longer be added to this story.
   Gail the Actuary on December 30, 2008 -

Repost 0
31 mars 2009 2 31 /03 /mars /2009 07:05

THE OIL DRUM CANADA  PEAK OIL POST PEAK-OIL PEAK ENERGY

http://canada.theoildrum.com/            http://canada.theoildrum.com/


Dans cette maison, nous obéissons aux lois de la thermodynamique!
Posté par Libelle sur Décembre 30, 2008 - 11:11 heures dans The Oil Drum: Canada
Rubrique: Divers
Tags: énergie, entropie, la chaleur, l'original, la thermodynamique, le travail [liste de tous les tags]

Lorsque vous utilisez l'énergie, les règles sont très bien définis. La première et la deuxième lois de la thermodynamique ont été bien comprises pour plus d'un siècle, et le troisième un peu plus d'un siècle, mais le sujet est toujours considéré par la plupart comme étant assez obscur. C'est dommage, parce que ces deux lois sont d'une telle importance, et parce que presque tout le monde a une bonne compréhension de la première et la deuxième lois, même si ils pensent qu'ils ne le font pas. Comprendre les implications de la législation est une autre question.



Il existe de nombreuses versions facétieux des lois. L'ensemble j'aime le plus est:


(zeroth droit) Vous devez jouer le jeu.
(première loi) Vous ne pouvez pas gagner.
(deuxième loi) Vous ne pouvez sortir, même sur une très froide journée.
(troisième loi) Il ne fait pas froid.


Celles-ci sont étonnamment exactes.

Les lois sont, il convient de rappeler, d'expérimentation à l'origine. Le monde a été trouvé à travailler de cette façon.




Zeroth loi
Le zeroth loi stipule effectivement que, si les deux systèmes A et B sont en équilibre les uns avec les autres, et les systèmes B et C sont également en equlibrium les uns avec les autres, puis les systèmes A et C sont également en équilibre avec l'autre. Une autre façon de faire, c'est que des situations comme Escher "Waterfall" ne se produisent pas dans la vraie vie.

Vous devez jouer le jeu.




Première loi
La première loi est la loi de conservation de l'énergie. Il comprend l'équivalence de la chaleur et de travail, mais est plus générale que, dans ce qu'il existe de nombreuses formes d'énergie qui sont interconvertible, mais avec le total pour un système isolé reste constante au fil du temps. Un point qui est souvent mal compris est le rôle de l'équation E = mc2. Il s'agit généralement de se référer à une conversion de la matière en énergie, mais la réalité est plus simple. L'énergie est la masse, l'équation et vous indique combien. Peu importe ce que la conversion a lieu dans un système isolé, son énergie totale (et donc de masse) reste constante.

Vous ne pouvez pas gagner.




Deuxième loi
La deuxième loi est celle qui résulte de l'observation à chaud que perdre de la chaleur à des choses froides. C'est un processus à sens unique. Travail mécanique peut être transformée en chaleur. La chaleur peut être transformée en travail mécanique, mais il ya des limites. Les implications de cette situation sont loin, et une somme peut être déduite (et définie) à partir de cette expérience et une pensée.

Si nous avons deux réservoirs de chaleur (à la fois pratique infinie de la capacité) à des températures différentes, alors on peut construire des dispositifs qui prennent la chaleur de la plus chaude du réservoir, tourner à certaines d'entre elles en travail mécanique et de rejeter le reste à la plus froide du réservoir. Le rejet d'une partie de la chaleur a été jugée inévitable, mais la quantité de rejets de chaleur devient de moins en moins que la température de la source de chaleur est élevée. En l'absence, à ce stade, de définir ce que nous entendons par la valeur numérique de la température, nous supposons que le maximum d'efficacité de conversion est une fonction précise de ces deux températures. Moteur de l'efficacité sont généralement définis comme [travail à la chaleur en], mais dans ce cas, je vais chercher à [la chaleur de la chaleur en] ou [1 - l'efficacité]. Si les températures des deux réservoirs sont T1 et T2 et de la chaleur tirée du T1 est plus chaud, et la chaleur libérée à l'q2 est froid, alors nous dirons que:

q2/q1 = F (T2, T1) F est une fonction encore inconnue (une expression algébrique) des deux températures.

Maximum d'efficacité implique la réversibilité du processus. Un exemple de ceci est que le transfert de chaleur plus chaude du réservoir au moteur doit être réalisé sans aucune différence de température entre le réservoir et la partie du moteur qui absorbe la chaleur. S'il n'y a aucune différence, le moteur thermique fonctionne à un rendement plus faible (plus petite différence de température entre le chaud et le froid), et il ne serait pas possible de lancer le processus vers l'arrière (pas de flux de chaleur "en amont"). Il ne peut y avoir des frictions soit. Le moteur avec un maximum d'efficacité est donc réversible et peut être utilisé comme une pompe à chaleur, le pompage de la chaleur du réservoir de la fontaine la plus chaude, et nécessitant un travail mécanique pour le faire. Les valeurs de Q1 et Q2 sont les mêmes que dans le cas du moteur, mais la direction du flux est inversée et le travail est mis dans le système plutôt que d'être pris. L'absence de différences de température entre le moteur / pompe à chaleur et de ses réservoirs de chaleur signifie aussi que les processus seront infiniment lente, mais c'est le cas pour toutes ces machines idéal.

Maintenant supposons que nous disposons d'un troisième réservoir de chaleur à une température plus basse encore, T3, et un deuxième moteur qui fonctionne entre le deuxième et le troisième de réservoirs. Si la prise de chaleur à partir de la deuxième réservoir est q2 (comme rejetée par le premier moteur), et qui a rejeté à la troisième est q3, alors:

q3/q2 = F (T3, T2)

Mais on pourrait plutôt avoir utilisé un moteur directement entre le premier et le troisième de réservoirs. Ce moteur doit avoir la même efficacité que la combinaison des deux autres, parce que si elle n'a pas, alors la chaleur pourrait être exécuté en continu autour du cycle de trois moteurs, en utilisant la puissance d'un ou de deux moteurs de conduire de l'autre (s ) vers l'arrière, laissant un filet de travailler avec la production de chaleur sont prises d'un seul réservoir. Ce ne serait pas cohérente avec la façon dont les choses fonctionnent. Donc:

q3/q1 = F (T3, T1)

Mais: q3/q1 = (q3/q2) x (q2/q1)

Donc: F (T3, T1) = F (T3, T2) x F (T2/T1)

Si vous n'avez pas éteint au début de l'algèbre, il devrait être évident que, de ce fait une très grave restriction sur la nature de la fonction F. Au cours de la dernière équation, T2 disparaît du côté droit, comme un simple résultat de la multiplication. Cela signifie que F (T1, T2) doit être de la forme f (T1) / f (T2), où f est une autre fonction.

Donc: q2/q1 = f (T2) / f (T1)

Vous mai pas oublier que j'ai commencé cet argument sans définir ce que l'on entend exactement par une température. Cette équation nous donne l'occasion de définir une échelle de température, par le choix de la fonction f. C'est ce que William Thomson (plus tard Lord Kelvin) a fait en 1848. Il a choisi de f (T) qui doit être aussi simple que possible:

f (T) = T

Donc: F (T2, T1) = T2/T1 = T2/T1 et q2/q1

En d'autres termes, une échelle de température absolue peut être définie en fonction du comportement des moteurs thermiques, des propriétés indépendantes de toute substance. Si un idéal moteur thermique a un rendement de conversion de 50% (la moitié de l'apport de chaleur est transformée en travail et la moitié de la chaleur rejetée), le ratio de la chaleur à la température de la source de chaleur la température est de 2 - par définition.


Pour compléter la définition d'une telle échelle de température absolue, nous avons besoin de définir la taille d'un diplôme. Si l'on mesure la taille tels que la différence entre les points de congélation et d'ébullition de l'eau est de 100 degrés, nous avons une échelle qui peut correspondre à l'échelle Celsius, mais avec un décalage correspondant au point de congélation de l'eau sur l'échelle absolue. Ce décalage se révèle 273,15 degrés et nous avons maintenant l'échelle Kelvin.

Entropy
L'idée de l'entropie est associée dans la plupart des esprits avec les idées d'ordre et de désordre (entropie plus élevé = plus de désordre). C'est correct, mais l'origine de l'idée vient de la circulation de la chaleur. Si une quantité de chaleur q entre dans un système (en valeur absolue) de la température T, puis de l'entropie du système augmente de q / T. Telle est la définition de l'entropie. Si nous regardons le premier moteur thermique ci-dessus, l'entropie de la plus chaude du réservoir diminue de q1/T1 et que l'augmentation de la glacière par q2/T2. Si le moteur est réversible, q2/q1 = T2/T1, de sorte que le changement global de l'entropie est nulle. C'est une caractéristique du processus réversible. En véritable processus, le changement total d'entropie est toujours positif. Un exemple en est le flux de chaleur d'un corps chaud à un élément froid - le chaud corps perd l'entropie, la glacière, mais on gagne plus d'un a perdu la plus chaude, depuis le T dans le q / T est l'expression la plus petite et q est le même.


Disponible de travail, ou Exergy
Le montant maximum de travail qui pourrait être extraite en tant que produit d'un processus (c'est-à-dire, si elle produit de façon réversible) peut aisément être calculé à partir de l'énergie et l'entropie des changements entre les Etats de départ et d'arrivée du processus. C'est ce qu'on appelle parfois l'exergie disponible au départ. Juste la façon dont elle est dérivée mai mai faire l'objet d'une autre affectation. Exergy, à la différence de l'énergie, mai être détruits. L'idéal de travail n'est jamais réalisé, bien sûr, mais il est assez simple de montrer que l'exergie irrémédiablement perdu quand un changement irréversible a lieu est égale à l'augmentation de l'entropie associée à l'irréversible, multiplié par la température de l'environnement dans lequel le processus prend place. C'est la température la plus basse à laquelle la chaleur peut être rejetée par le processus. Il s'ensuit que si la température de l'environnement est le zéro absolu, il n'ya pas de perte d'exergie ou disponibles travail, quoi qu'il arrive.

Vous ne pouvez sortir, même sur une très froide journée.




Troisième loi
Il ya deux façons de la troisième loi en déclarant:

L'entropie de chaque substance à l'état pur au zéro absolu est égal à zéro.
C'est impossible à atteindre le zéro absolu en un nombre fini d'étapes.

La raison pour laquelle la seconde découle de la première est que tout processus qui réduit la température d'une substance doit comporter une étape dans laquelle le changement d'entropie. Si l'entropie de tout est nul, alors pas de changement d'entropie sont possibles et il n'y a pas moyen de le faire tout de refroidissement. En fait, la loi est observé que le changement d'entropie est toujours à zéro. Il est alors facile de déclarer tous les entropies zéro au zéro absolu, ce qui correspond à l'interprétation statistique de l'entropie. On peut obtenir de très près (en degrés) du zéro absolu - le record actuel est d'environ 10-10K, mais l'on se rapproche, plus il devient difficile de refroidir.

Il ne fait pas froid.




-------------------------------------------------------



In this house we obey the laws of thermodynamics!
Posted by Libelle on December 30, 2008 - 11:11 pm in The Oil Drum: Canada
Topic: Miscellaneous
Tags: energy, entropy, heat, original, thermodynamics, work [list all tags]

When you use energy, the rules are well defined. The first and second laws of thermodynamics have been well understood for more than a century, and the third a little more than a century, but the topic is still considered by most to be rather obscure. That is unfortunate, because these two laws are so important, and because almost everyone has a good understanding of the first and second laws, even if they think they do not. Understanding the implications of the legislation is another matter.



There are many versions of mischievous acts. All I like most is:


(zeroth law) You must play the game
(first law) You can not win.
(second law) You can not break even on a very cold day.
(Third Law) It is not cold.


They are surprisingly accurate.

The laws are, it should be recalled, experimentation at the outset. The world has been found to work that way.




Zeroth law
The zeroth law actually states that if two systems A and B are in equilibrium with each other, and systems B and C are also in equlibrium with each other, then systems A and C are also in equilibrium with another. Another way, is that situations like Escher "Waterfall" will not occur in real life.

You must play the game




First law
The first law is the law of conservation of energy. It includes the equivalence of heat and working conditions, but is more general in that there are many forms of energy are interconvertible, but the total for an isolated system remains constant over time. One point that is often misunderstood is the role of the equation E = mc2. It is usually refer to a conversion of matter into energy, but the reality is more simple. Energy is the mass, the equation and tells you how. Whatever the conversion takes place in an isolated system, its total energy (and hence mass) remains constant.

You can not win.




Second Act
The second law is that which results from the observation that hot losing heat to cold things. This is a one-way process. Mechanical work is transformed into heat. The heat can be converted into mechanical work, but there are limits. The implications of this are far and an amount can be deducted (and defined) from this experience and thought.

If we have two heat reservoirs (both practical infinite capacity) at different temperatures, then we can build devices that take heat from the hotter reservoir, turn some of them into mechanical work and reject the rest to the cold tank. The rejection of some of the heat was considered inevitable, but the amount of waste heat becomes less than the temperature of the heat source is high. In the absence at this stage to define what we mean by the numerical value of the temperature, we assume that the maximum conversion efficiency is a function of both temperatures. Engine efficiency is generally defined as [working in the heat], but in this case, I will look at [the heat of the heat] or [1 - effectiveness]. If temperatures are two tanks T1 and T2 and heat from the T1 is warmer and the heat released in q2 is cold, then we say that:

q2/q1 = F (T2, T1) F is an unknown function (an algebraic expression) of the two temperatures.

Maximum efficiency implies the reversibility of the process. An example of this is that the heat transfer hottest tank engine must take place without any difference in temperature between the tank and the engine that absorbs heat. If there is no difference, the heat engine operates at a lower efficiency (smaller temperature difference between hot and cold), and it would not be possible to run the process backwards (no heat flow "upstream"). There can be friction either. The engine with maximum efficiency is reversible and can be used as a heat pump, pumping heat from the reservoir of the fountain hottest and requiring mechanical work to do. The values of Q1 and Q2 are the same as in the case of the engine, but the direction of flow is reversed and the work is put into the system rather than be taken. The absence of differences in temperature between the engine / heat pump and its heat reservoirs also means that the process will be much slower, but it is the case for all these machines ideal.

Now suppose we have a third heat reservoir at a lower temperature still, T3, and a second engine that operates between the second and third reservoirs. If the heat from the second tank is q2 (rejected by the first engine) and has rejected the third q3, then:

q3/q2 = F (T3, T2)

But we could instead have used a motor directly between the first and third reservoirs. This engine must have the same efficiency as the combination of the other two, because if it did not, then the heat could be run continuously around the cycle of three engines, using the power of one or two engines driving the other (s) to the rear, leaving a net work with the production of heat is taken from a single reservoir. This is not consistent with the way things work. So:

q3/q1 = F (T3, T1)

But: q3/q1 = (q3/q2) x (q2/q1)

So: F (T3, T1) = F (T3, T2) x F (T2/T1)

If you have not turned off at the beginning of algebra, it should be obvious that this is a very serious restriction on the nature of the function F. During the last equation, T2 on the right side disappears, as a result of simple multiplication. This means that F (T1, T2) must be of the form f (T1) / f (T2), where f is another function.

So: q2/q1 = f (T2) / f (T1)

May you not forget that I started this argument without defining what is meant by a temperature. This equation gives us the opportunity to define a temperature scale, by selecting the function f. That's what William Thomson (later Lord Kelvin) was in 1848. He chose f (T) to be as simple as possible:

f (T) = T

So: F (T2, T1) = T2/T1 and T2/T1 = q2/q1

In other words, an absolute temperature scale can be defined as a function of engine thermal properties are independent of any substance. If an ideal heat engine has a conversion efficiency of 50% (half of the heat is converted into work and half of the heat rejected), the ratio of heat to the temperature of heat source temperature is 2 - by definition.


To complete the definition of such an absolute temperature scale, we need to define the size of a diploma. If we measure size as the difference between the freezing and boiling water is 100 degrees, we have a scale that may correspond to the Celsius scale, but with a lag corresponding to the point of freezing of water on the absolute scale. This discrepancy is 273.15 degrees and now we have the Kelvin scale.

Entropy
The idea of entropy is associated in most minds with the ideas of order and disorder (entropy higher = more disorder). That is correct, but the origin of the idea comes from the flow of heat. If a quantity of heat q enters a system (absolute) temperature T, then the system increases the entropy of q / T. That is the definition of entropy. If we look at the first heat engine above, the entropy of the hot reservoir decreases q1/T1 and the increase of the cooler by q2/T2. If the engine is reversible, q2/q1 = T2/T1, so the overall change in entropy is zero. It is a characteristic of the process is reversible. In real process, the total change of entropy is always positive. One example is the flow of heat from a warm body to a cooler - the hot body loses entropy, the cooler, but we win more than one has lost the hottest since the T in the q / T is the most small and q is the same.


Available work, or Exergy
The maximum amount of work that could be extracted as a product of a process (ie, if it produces a reversible manner) can be easily calculated from energy and entropy changes between States of departure and arrival process. This is sometimes called the exergy available initially. Just how it is derived in May May be another assignment. Exergy, unlike energy, may be destroyed. The ideal of work is never done, of course, but it is fairly simple to show that the exergy irretrievably lost when an irreversible change takes place is equal to the increase in entropy associated with the irreversible, multiplied by the temperature of the environment in which the process takes place. This is the lowest temperature at which heat can be rejected by the process. It follows that if the ambient temperature is absolute zero, there is no loss of exergy or available work, no matter what.

You can not escape, even on a very cold day.




Third Law
There are two ways of the third law by stating:

The entropy of each pure substance at absolute zero is zero.
It is impossible to achieve absolute zero in a finite number of steps.

The reason why the second follows from the first is that any process that reduces the temperature of a substance must contain a step in which the change of entropy. If any of the entropy is zero, then no change of entropy are possible and there is no way to do it for cooling. In fact, the law is observed that the change of entropy is always zero. It is easy to declare all entropies zero at absolute zero, which corresponds to the statistical interpretation of entropy. It can get very close (in degrees) of absolute zero - the current record is around 10-10K, but it gets closer, it becomes more difficult to cool.

It is not cold.




Repost 0
31 mars 2009 2 31 /03 /mars /2009 06:56



http://www.quebecoislibre.org/09/090315-13.htm



EN QUELQUES MOIS, UNE DÉCENNIE
DE RESPONSABILITÉ FISCALE À LA POUBELLE *

 

par John Paul Koning

 

          Août 1996 a marqué un tournant pour le gouvernement canadien. À l’époque, la dette fédérale transigée sur les marchés financiers avait été en croissance depuis plusieurs dizaines d’années(1). De 1970 à 1980, la dette a triplé, passant de 24 milliards à 70 milliards de dollars. Seize ans plus tard, en août 1996, elle atteignait les 474 milliards – environ 16 000$ par Canadien et Canadienne. C’est à cette époque que Paul Martin, alors ministre des Finances, rompit avec le passé en stabilisant la dette, qui commença alors à décroître. Lorsque Martin quitta le ministère des Finances en 2002, les emprunts du Canada se chiffraient alors sous les 450 milliards (voir le tableau ci-dessous).

 

          S’enchaînèrent les ministres John Manley, Ralph Goodale, et Jim Flaherty, qui à leur tour supprimèrent un autre 65 milliards de la dette nationale. Au début de l’année 2008, la dette était de 383 milliards de dollars – 11 600$ par habitant, atteignant ainsi son plus bas niveau depuis des années. La diminution de la dette s’accompagna d’une baisse des paiements d’intérêt, libérant ainsi des dizaines de milliards de dollars pour les dépenses et les baisses d’impôts.

          L’expérience canadienne était unique: pendant la même période, la dette nationale de l’État américain, sous l’influence de George Bush et de ses politiques guerrières, connaissait l’une des plus rapides croissances jamais observées aux États Unis. De même, les gouvernements japonais et européens se livraient à d’importantes dépenses, accroissant leur niveau d’endettement. Les fonctionnaires canadiens, eux, évitèrent la tentation d’imiter les mauvaises habitudes de ces nations plus puissantes.

          Malheureusement, les tendances récentes indiquent que l’époque de la réduction de la dette canadienne a touché à sa fin. Ce qui surprend est la vitesse à laquelle ce changement s’est opéré: en l’espace de quelques mois, le gouvernement fédéral s’est endetté d’environ 90 milliards de dollars, en bons et en billets du Trésor pour la plus grande partie. La majorité de cette somme, soit 75 milliards, a été dépensée entre octobre 2008 et janvier 2009. À l’heure actuelle, l’endettement du Canada se chiffre aux environs de 478 milliards, brisant le record enregistré en 1996. Tout cela est d’autant plus choquant qu’en janvier de l’année dernière, la dette était à son plus bas niveau depuis 1993.

          Mais où sont donc passés ces 75 milliards de dollars? Une somme de 50 milliards a servi à l’achat de titres hypothécaires garantis par la Société canadienne d’hypothèques et de logement (SCHL), des achats promis aux grandes banques canadiennes par Jim Flaherty(2). Une autre somme de 41 milliards repose présentement dans les comptes du gouvernement à la Banque du Canada et à d’autres banque commerciales; une grande partie de cet argent servira à l’achat d’une série de titres hypothécaires supplémentaires. Le ministre Flaherty, qui avait tout d’abord promis d’acheter pour 25 milliards de titres, a gonflé ce chiffre à 75 milliards en décembre, et à 125 milliards dans le budget de 2009.

          Comme si ce n’était pas assez, le gouvernement vient tout juste d’annoncer un budget fédéral gargantuesque. Le ministère des Finances prédit que le déficit de l’année fiscale qui débutera en mars 2009 s’élèvera à 33,7 milliards, et que le déficit de l’année suivante s’élèvera à 29,8 milliards. Avec l’achat des titres hypothécaires, ces déficits devraient faire grimper la dette fédérale à 512 milliards en mars qui vient, et à 593 milliards en mars de l’année suivante(3). En 2011, l’endettement dépassera les 600 milliards, une croissance de 60-70% en l’espace de quelques années seulement. Sur le graphique, on peut voir que la réduction de la dette fédérale pour la période de 1996 à 2007 n’est plus qu’une triste aberration.
 

« Le rôle de l’État n’est pas d’agir comme fonds de placement, et ce n’est pas non plus la responsabilité du ministre Flaherty de commencer sa journée en observant un écran de Bloomberg, à la recherche de placements à acheter à bon prix avec l’argent des contribuables pour les revendre à profit. »


          Certains aiment à qualifier cette nouvelle dette de « bonne » dette. Le ministre Flaherty, par exemple, présente sa décision de dépenser 125 milliards de dollars dans des titres hypothécaires comme une opportunité pour tous les Canadiens d’en tirer profit. Après tout, les intérêts payés sur les bons et billets émis par le gouvernement sont inférieurs aux revenus d’intérêt qui devraient être collectés sur les titres hypothécaires, et un profit net devrait être enregistré.

          Ne nous leurrons pas. Si les grandes banques canadiennes ont tant besoin de 125 milliards, pourquoi ne vendent-elles pas leurs titres hypothécaires sur le marché financier? Après tout, il existe un marché secondaire actif pour les titres hypothécaires garantis par le SCHL, auquel participent les sociétés d’assurance, les fonds de placement, les fonds souverains et les régimes d’assurance publique.

          La réponse est simple: les banques préfèrent vendre leurs titres hypothécaires au gouvernement parce que celui-ci leur en offre un prix supérieur à celui du marché. Sur tout marché, vendre pour 125 milliards alarmerait les acheteurs, qui se retireraient, forçant le vendeur à baisser ses prix. L’achat des titres par le gouvernement évite aux banques de subir cette perte. Par exemple, payer les banques 10 milliards au-dessus du prix du marché équivaut à une subvention de 300$ par canadien. La plupart d’entre nous ne sauront jamais où est passé cet argent.

          Le rôle de l’État n’est pas d’agir comme fonds de placement, et ce n’est pas non plus la responsabilité du ministre Flaherty de commencer sa journée en observant un écran de Bloomberg, à la recherche de placements à acheter à bon prix avec l’argent des contribuables pour les revendre à profit. C’est le rôle des Canadiens et Canadiennes de choisir leurs investissements et leurs placements spéculatifs, avec l’aide de leurs conseillers financiers. Il est peu probable que ces individus soient aussi enthousiastes que M. Flaherty à l’idée d’acheter les actifs des banques à un prix bien au-dessus de celui du marché.

          Un autre argument en faveur de la nouvelle dette est que l’achat des titres hypothécaires remplace les titres non liquides dans les bilans des grandes banques par de l’argent qu’elles pourront prêter aux individus et aux entreprises présentement à court de fonds. « C’est dans l’intérêt collectif! », va le dicton.

          Mais ça serait ignorer les coûts cachés d’une telle opération. À l’avenir, les banques canadiennes seront incitées à investir dans toutes sortes de titres non liquides et risqués. Après tout, rien n’empêche un gouvernement qui a déjà acheté pour 125 milliards de titres à un prix artificiellement élevé de piger à nouveau dans le portefeuille des contribuables pour répéter l’affaire. Ce genre de transaction récompense l’irresponsabilité, affaiblit notre système bancaire, et comporte des frais cachés pour tous les Canadiens.

          Quelle honte de voir notre endettement exploser après plus d’une décennie de responsabilité fiscale, sans bénéfice net pour les Canadiens ni pour leur système bancaire, qui feront les frais de ces investissements douteux. L’échec du Canada à diminuer sa dette nationale démontre qu’on ne peut compter sur un gouvernement quand vient le temps de réduire sa propre taille. Tout temps de crise lui servira d’occasion pour prendre encore plus d’ampleur.

 

* Ce texte est d'abord paru en version anglaise le 15 février 2009 dans les pages du QL. Il a été traduit par Marie St-Laurent.

1. Cette dette inclut les bons et billets du Trésor, et les obligations d’épargne du Canada.
2. Voir « Le gouvernement du Canada réagit aux turbulences financières mondiales en soutenant les marchés canadiens du crédit », Ministère des Finances Canada, 2008-10-10.
3. Voir Tableau A4.4 du budget fédéral de 2009 dans « Annexe 4 - Stratégie de gestion de la dette 2009-2010 », Ministère des Finances Canada, 2009-01-27.

Repost 0

Présentation

  • : QUEBEC-CANADA
  • : QUEBEC CANADA
  • Contact

Recherche